Pain

Cultivating Wellness: Project CBD Survey Results

Project CBD releases the results of one of the most extensive CBD user surveys to date.

Cannabis Legalization & Opioid Overdose

Orange pill bottles and spilled white pills

Opioids leave much to be desired in medical treatment. They are highly addictive, very lethal, and not all that effective for treating chronic pain. Cannabis, particularly THC, is promising for its opiate-sparing properties: preclinical work indicates that cannabis synergizes with the painkilling effects of opioids and reduces the development of tolerance (perhaps because of this synergy) but does not increase opioid-induced respiratory depression which leads to death. Moreover, states that legalize cannabis see a decrease in opioid prescriptions.

Cannabis in Hospice Care

The elderly are the fastest growing population of cannabis users. But how do hospice workers feel about their patients using cannabis? A recent survey by pharmacists at the University of Maryland asked palliative care practitioners about their opinions on cannabis use among hospice patients. Over 90% of workers support the use of cannabis, but most physicians did not recommend cannabis to their patients. This may be due to a lack of knowledge about safe use of cannabis — over 80% of respondents wanted standardized protocols on the use of cannabis in palliative care.

Preventing Pain with Orphan Receptors

Black man covering his eyes

Phytocannabinoids consistently confuse scientists because of the multiplicity of their actions. CBD, for example, binds to a handful of neurotransmitter receptors, as well as hormone receptors, ion channels, and a variety of enzymes. Receptors without a known endogenous ligand are called “orphan” receptors. GPR18 is involved in ocular-pressure (and hence glaucoma treatment) as well as cardiovascular function.

THC Makes Oxycodone Safer

Many prohibitionist arguments are being flipped on their heads. CBD’s anti-anxiety effects have replaced much of the reefer madness mentality. Rather than causing lung cancer, marijuana appears to have anti-cancer activity, if anything. And in spite of the gateway theory, whereby casual cannabis use supposedly escalates to heroin, we find that cannabis helps to treat pain and reduce opiate use. An animal study out of the Scripps Research Institute reaffirms that THC generally reduces the addictiveness of opioids.

Thanks to our sponsors and supporters:

Top Stories